How to Fix a Fuse That Keeps Blowing: Causes and Solutions

If you have ever had a fuse in your house blow, you know it can be a real pain.

Especially if it happens frequently, it can be frustrating trying to track down the source of the problem. Does it ever occur to you? 

If your fuse is blowing, the most likely cause is an overloaded circuit. You can try moving some of the devices on your circuit breaker to other outlets in your house or adding a new outlet to your breaker. 

fuse box illuminated with light

If that does not work, you may need to have a licensed electrician look at your wiring and make some changes.

Reasons Why Your Fuse Keeps Blowing

There are a few reasons why your fuse might keep blowing.

There is A Short Circuit

One of the most common reasons your fuse keeps blowing is due to a short circuit.

A short circuit breaker occurs when there is a break in the electrical circuit because of electric current overload.

It means that the current flowing through the circuit is higher than what the fuse can handle, and so it blows to protect your home from a potential fire. It can happen if the wires have a loose connection.

Striped wires are also especially susceptible to short circuits.

When wires become damaged or frayed, they can cross and create a spark that ignites combustible materials nearby.

While metal wires are susceptible to short circuits, striped wires are especially vulnerable.

The insulation around striped wires is thinner than other electric wires, making them more prone to damage.

In addition, the stripped portion of the wire is exposed, thus increasing the risk of a short circuit.

You can prevent electrical fires by regularly inspecting and replacing them if damaged. 

Faulty Outlets

Faulty outlets can cause the current to spike, which can cause the fuse to blow.

In some cases, the outlet itself may be damaged and need replacement. However, if the outlet appears to be in good condition, it is possible that the wiring behind it is loose or frayed.

It is hazardous and vital to have an electrician check it out as soon as possible. In the meantime, you can try using a different outlet for your appliances.

Overloaded Circuits

Have you ever blown a fuse? If you have, you know it is not a fun experience.

It does not only disrupt your power supply, but it can also be tough to figure out what caused the problem in the first place.

multiple electricity plugs on adapter risk of overloading

In most cases, the culprit is an overloaded circuit. When too many devices are drawing power from the same power circuit, it can cause the circuit to overheat and trip the fuse.

To avoid this problem, be sure to distribute your devices evenly across all of the circuits in your home. And if you are ever in doubt, err on the side of caution and plug into a different outlet.

Step by Step Guide on How to Fix a Fuse for Beginners

When you flip the switch to turn on a light and nothing happens, it is time to get out the fuse box and find out which fuse is defective.

If you are like most people, this is not something you do every day, so you may need a little help getting started.

This step-by-step guide will show you how to fix a fuse for beginners.

Step One: Turn Off the Power

Before you do anything, make sure there is no power running through the circuit.

Otherwise, you could electrocute yourself. What you need to do is to flip the breaker switch off.

Step Two: Locate Your Fuse Box

After turning off the power, you need to look for your fuse box. Here are areas where your fuse box might be inside your house:

  • Utility closet
  • Under the stairs
  • Laundry room
  • Garage
  • Attic

Step Three: Identify the Blown Fuse

Locating a tripped fuse in the house can be a daunting task – but it does not have to be! With a few simple tips, you can easily find the source of the problem and get your home back up and running in no time.

The first step is to check all of the circuit breakers in your home. If ever you find that one that tripped, reset it and see if that solves the problem. If not, it is time to move on to the next step.

The next step is to locate the main electrical panel and open it up. Inside, you should see a row of fuses – that matches the different areas of your home.

After locating the fuse that corresponds to the affected area, replace it with a new one and close up the panel. With these simple steps, you have your power back.

Step Four: Choose the Right Replacement Fuse

Choosing the correct replacement fuse for your electrical needs can be confusing if you do not know which one to choose.

The first step is to identify the size of the fuse you need. Fuses are typically available in three different sizes, 1/4 inches, 1/2 inches, and 3/4 inches.

The next step is to determine the amperage rating of the fuse. The amperage rating is on the side of the fuse, and it indicates how much current the fuse can safely handle.

The course of action is to choose a fuse with the correct voltage rating. The voltage rating is on the side of the fuse, and it indicates how much voltage the fuse can safely handle.

Finally, select a fuse compatible with the type of electrical device you will be using. Fuses are available in different kinds, including fast-acting, time-delay, and thermal-magnetic.

Choosing the correct type of fuse will help to ensure that your electrical device is safe from damage.

Step Five: Insert the Replacement Fuse

Inserting the replacement fuse is a simple process that anyone can do. First, locate the fuse box and find the blown house fuse.

Then remove it from the box and hold it up to the light. If the metal filament inside is broken, it needs replacement.

Take the new fuse and insert it into the fuse box in the same spot as the old one. 

Step Six: Test the Circuit

Before testing the circuit, it is essential to know that all the components are connected correctly.

Check the diagram to ensure that the wires are in the correct terminals.

electrician working on a residential electric panel

After verifying the connections are correct, you can begin testing the circuit.

To test the circuit, you will need a multimeter. Begin by setting the multimeter to the “ohms” setting.

Then, touch the probes to the two terminals of the resistor. The multimeter should register a resistance of approximately 10 ohms.

If the multimeter does not register a resistance, check the connections and try again. If the multimeter still does not register, then the resistor is most likely defective and should be replaced.

Next, touch the probes to the two terminals of the capacitor. The multimeter should register a capacitance of approximately ten microfarads.

If the multimeter does not register a capacitance, you should check the connections and try again.

If the multimeter still does not register a capacitance, then the capacitor is most likely defective and should be replaced.

Once you have tested both the resistor and capacitor, you can move on to testing the LED. Touch one probe of the multimeter to the positive terminal of the LED and the other probe to the negative terminal.

The multimeter should register a voltage of approximately 0.

If the multimeter does not register a voltage, check the connections and try again. If the multimeter still does not register a voltage, the LED is likely defective and needs replacement.

If all of the components are working correctly, the circuit is complete. You can move on to the next project.

Final Thoughts

Replacing a fuse is a simple process that anyone can do. By following these six easy steps, you can have your power back in no time.

Be sure to choose the correct replacement fuse for your electrical needs and test the circuit before moving on to the next project.